Crash Restraint News & Updates

New Shinju Videos

Topologist

I posted videos this week of how to tie two versions of the classic Shinju chest harness; one is a more traditional variation which makes a good first technique for beginners to learn, the other is one of my own design that is optimized for suspension.

Also recently added are videos on the sheet bend technique I use to extend ropes, and how I keep track of the center of my rope.

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CTKv4 Updates

Topologist

I've added some new information to the CTKv4 article, including:

Ropeboi also pointed out to me that I failed to mention in the list of benefits of the split stem how much more comfortable it makes this TK for lying on your back in! BondageNexus posted a great photo illustrating this.

 

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Chest Loading Takate Kote Version 4

Topologist

I've just posted a video and in-depth article on the latest version of my chest loading TK. For those using and happy with one of the earlier versions, you may still find some of the information in the article relevant, as I delve in much more depth into the theory and design principles behind the CTK.

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A Fast, Partially-Chest-Loading Takate Kote

Topologist

WARNING: This tie is highly experimental -- recommended ONLY for careful use by very experienced practitioners.

Here's a new design based on two premises:

  1. That the lower wraps should be the main concern in relation to radial nerve injury
  2. That the upper kannuki are not really needed for much

While to my mind these proposals are both far from proven, if one takes them to be correct, then this is the TK I think one would want.


The lower wraps are done according to the Version 3 CTK method; in my very limited testing with one bottom, this approach put the most noticeable amount of load on the lower ribcage in almost all positions, and was generally at least as stable as a traditional 2-rope TK. While for some bottoms the load on the ribs will be problematic as shown, tensions could probably be adjusted to put more force on the upper wraps and/or lower arms if desired.

How you attach support lines is very important to avoid the issue that Esinem succinctly illustrates...

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Version 3 Chest-loading Takate Kote

Topologist

Important Update: There is a newer version of this tie published; this article is of purely historical interest.

I have previously posted two TK variations designed to transfer load from the arms to the chest. I won't repeat the justification for why you might want this, but will briefly remind you: these ties are hopefully safer than traditional variations, but still may be highly dangerous, particularly if misused; pay careful attention, use good judgment, and above all seek qualified in-person instruction before attempting to use these for suspension.

Over the past year and a half or so, since originally publishing a CTK, I have continued to experiment with various designs based on the same principles. My currently preferred variation generally requires at least 3 ropes, due to an unusual start which I'll explain the reasons for at the bottom, once you've seen what I'm talking about. While any variation using half-hitches in the way this one does may be considered...

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A Chest-loading Takate Kote

Topologist

Important Update: There is a newer version of this tie published; this article is of purely historical interest.

There is some debate in the community over the relative safety of the takate kote for suspension; regardless of how you feel about that, you may find these variations useful. The general idea is that by adding a few well-placed knots, suspension load can be shifted from the arms to the chest, while maintaining the general look, feel, and experience of a normal TK. Most bottoms seem to find this more comfortable, and my hope is that it will prove safer.

Some disclaimers:

First of all, watching these videos does not make you qualified to do this tie. These are intended for an audience already familiar and comfortable with tying and suspending with TKs; no attempt is made to cover the general safety information necessary to use these responsibly.

Second, while I have solicited feedback from a number of other riggers, and done extensive testing on a small number of bottoms,...

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