Slipped Half Hitch

Notes and Resources:

For securing a line under load, tie a slipped half hitch to avoid jamming, then tie second half hitch with the bight(s) to prevent accidental release (if necessary).

You can see the slipped half hitch tied here:

And another one tied and locked off, here:

Comments

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    CallMeDiRk | Jun 10th, 2016 2:27pm PDT #

    Links to YouTube not working and can't find this on vimeo channel

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      CallMeDiRk | Jun 10th, 2016 3:14pm PDT #

      Looks like this is the first video on Vimeo titled "Securing Support Lines (Wrap and Slipped Hitch)"?

      https://vimeo.com/channels/bondage/121189769

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        Topologist | Jun 10th, 2016 6:36pm PDT #

        Fixed the video links, thanks! It looks like my Vimeo player controls to pre-queue them to the right spot aren't working, though, will need to work on that...

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      platypus | Mar 29th, 2017 10:12am PDT #

      Why do you call this a 'slipped half hitch' instead of a 'slippery half hitch?' Standardization of terms is really useful!

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        Topologist | Mar 29th, 2017 10:41am PDT #

        In short, because Slipped Half Hitch is its correct name. See Ashley's pg 14-15; #44 explains that the term "slipped" may be applied to any knot "having a similar feature" as the Slip Knot, being able to be "spilled or slipped instantly by pulling on the end to withdraw a loop" -- and #52 illustrates this as applied to the Slipped Half Hitch, so titled.

        It appears that in modern usage (and particularly on the Internet), there is some confusion, and the term "slippery half hitch" is frequently used to refer to the Slipped Half Hitch and/or Slipped Clove Hitch; however the Slippery Half Hitch is actually an entirely different knot, which I have never seen used personally -- refer to Ashley's #1619, pg 286.

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        jenn | Dec 3rd, 2017 1:06pm PST #

        Hi there, I just want to say that ALL of your tutorials are absolutely amazing. I have visited other sites but yours is clearly the best for two reasons. Firstly, your videos are exceptional. The camera is always in the best possible position: close enough to show in detail exactly what you're doing. At other sites, the camera is sometimes too far away from the instructor's hands for us to see some of the more subtle steps in a tie. This can be a big disappointment when we want to learn certain ties but can't see clearly enough what the instructor is doing. The other strength of your videos are your many comments regarding WHY you do things in a particular way and the many tips you provide for a better experience whether for tops or bottoms. I'm so looking forward to future videos (you mentioned you might put some on line after the Xmas holidays). You're obviously a true master with regard to the technical aspects of ties but just as importantly, you're a remarkable teacher! Knowing and teaching are two very distinct skill sets...and you have both. So, let me say three things: thank-you, thank-you, thank-you! We are lucky to have you.

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          oscarwilde | Feb 14th, 2018 12:13am PST #

          @Topologist Firstly, Thank you for this resource! This is amazing and incredibly helpful.

          It appears that the second video's timing is off slightly. Just thought I'd mention it.

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            RocknRope | Mar 12th, 2018 11:16am PDT #

            I concur, the second video runs from 6:25 to 6:46 and then stops, I didn't see a slipped half hitch. And I definitely have to say also that I'me, very happy with your site! Recommending it to everybody who asks about where to learn, beginner or otherwise =)

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