Sheet Bend Rope Extension

Notes and Resources:

This method of rope extension allows you to join a new rope anywhere along an old rope; it does not depend on end knots to stay put. It lays flat against the body, and can be easily adjusted after tying by sliding a bit of slack through the knot in order to fine-tune its positioning (for example, so that it doesn't wind up right on a collarbone).

It takes a little practice to get the hang of this method, but once you learn the motion it can be done very fast. I use this almost 100% of the time for extending ropes.

A bend is the name for a knot that joins two ropes, and a Sheet Bend is one of the most popular. This slight variation doesn't have a standard name, but could be called a Sheet Bend on a Bight.

Needed for:
Other ties related to: Extending Rope

Comments

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    ShadowSoul42 | Mar 14th, 2017 6:23pm PDT #

    very cool. now i dont have to knot most of my ends.

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      Rahere | Apr 8th, 2019 12:41pm PDT #

      A better reason for this is if you have to undo a rigging in a hurry: knots can jam under strain. Yes, you have shears to cut them loose, don't you? But if you can take the tails out easily, one less headache.

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      Fyrebyrd | Aug 1st, 2017 6:18pm PDT #

      This is much nicer than the way I was joining. The ropes stay flat with no twisting.

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        felixdartmouth | Sep 17th, 2017 5:04pm PDT #

        Also, it pulls more evenly on both ropes, whereas the larkshead join can pull more on one rope than then other, creating unevenness.

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          meurglys | Oct 21st, 2017 11:28am PDT #

          Very nice, quick and secure.

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            pleasedonotstop | Nov 17th, 2017 1:07am PST #

            Very nice ! Is it appropriate to use it to join suspension lines? If not, what would you recommend to join suspension lines/extend a suspension line ? Thanks !!

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              Topologist | Nov 26th, 2017 2:59pm PST #

              While this is a fairly secure bend, I'd recommend against extending suspension lines in general -- not so much because the join might come undone, as because it won't slide through your ring/biners/hanger smoothly or at all. Try to stay out of situations where you're using a support line that is not long enough to lower all the way to the ground with.

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                Rahere | Apr 8th, 2019 12:46pm PDT #

                How do you feel about using a larger line (say, 8mm vs 6mm for harness work) for suspension lines? I'm very glad to see the gradual disappearance of the "8m and nothing else" camp, in passing: the right tool for the job includes the right line length. The reason for this is because every knot in a line reduces the strength locally by 40% at the very least, even a friction wrap. Therefore, joining lines may be needed in drafting a scene, but once sorted, record it. Keep a notebook, so if you want to come back to it again, you have a refresher on the lessons you learned.

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