Slipped Somerville Bowline [Level 1]

  There are 5 techniques you should learn before this one. Click here to add this tie as a goal and see them in order.

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    Vagab0nd | Feb 26th, 2018 9:47am PST #

    Hey teach’. The video is down at the moment and can’t find the text instructions you referred to, but I found the following from SirTalon75: https://youtu.be/iMtfBTqNI0Y

    That seems to work pretty well and looks similar to Lochai’s picture in your linked blog entry. Is that correct? Can I say I “Learned It,” yet? :)

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      Topologist | Mar 3rd, 2018 5:46pm PST #

      That's a clever variation -- they're locking it off in a different, but certainly valid, way from what I'd previously described. The slipping of the knot is indeed the same.

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      ThatMan | Oct 2nd, 2019 1:35am PDT #

      Sensei, the video is broken

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        Rahere | Sep 19th, 2021 11:39am PDT #

        A slipped variant is one where the knot hasn't been fully formed, in general by passing a bight (OK, a hump, to you lubbers) in the running end rather than the whole running end. It'll hold, but can be pulled back if needed. An additional safety runs the running end through the bight. In general, the standing end is the end of the rope that's attached to something, the running end is the end you're working with. In this instance, because we're building that attachment, I'm reversing the idea, as we're using a short tail to work with: it's the bit which goes through the loop. Once tied, the Somerville end becomes the standing end.

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