Traditional Rope Coiling

Notes and Resources:

There is a large family of related but slightly different rope coiling techniques, which collectively I'm calling "traditional" coiling in the sense that they're widely preferred by practitioners of Japanese-derived rope styles.

There are (at least) three different ways of forming the coil -- folding, figure 8, and figure 8 with a single fold at the end -- as well as two different general approaches to finishing the bundle: by tucking the bight under the securing wraps, or by passing the bight through the end of the bundle.

Each combination provides a somewhat different compromise in terms of coiling speed, uncoiling speed, security, tangle-resistance, and bundle aesthetics. Which one is right for you comes down to personal preference.

I recommend starting with the technique Giotto demonstrates here.

A slightly more popular variation, which is less secure but faster to undo, is to use the figure-8 bundle as Giotto shows, but finish the tuck with a bight, as shown here by TwistedView.

You can see an example of the through-the-bundle finishing method here.

Erin Houdini has an interesting variation on Kink Academy, if you have an account there, as well.

Other ties related to: Coiling

Comments

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    GrizzlyChief | Jan 23rd, 2016 9:26pm PST #

    First link/video is unavailable.

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      Topologist | Jan 25th, 2018 5:33pm PST #

      Thanks, updated video links.

      Reply to this comment

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      Litchic26 | Aug 27th, 2018 5:59pm PDT #

      That first video is hilarious. Love the oiling with toe jam.

      Reply to this comment

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        iluvuninja | Dec 10th, 2018 7:43pm PST #

        First video down again, sadly.

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